Partners

Adult female Black-and-chestnut-Eagle captured for banding and satellite transmitter installation, Argentina © Tomás Rivas Fuenzalida | Fundación Ñankulafkén
BOW Team November 24, 2022
In this all-new, comprehensive review for Birds of the World, authors Tomás Rivas-Fuenzalida, Juan Manuel Grande, Sebastián Kohn, Félix Hernán Vargas and Santiago Zuluaga Castañeda update the status of knowledge of the species, including unpublished information and works in preparation.
Red de Observadores de Aves y Vida Silvestre de Chile
BOW Team September 9, 2022
To celebrate our growing partnership, this Tuesday, the ROC will host a webinar, featuring our very own Tom Schulenberg, BOW science editor, with Fernando Medrano (@FmedranoM), the technical and scientific advisor of ROC, who will discuss what the partnership means for Chilean birds and birders, and Javiera Ferreyra (@jaferreyrab), director of Audubon Chile.
Venezuelan Union of Ornithologists (UVO)
BOW Team September 7, 2022
Birds of the World has a simple but ambitious goal: to be the definitive resource for the collected biology of every bird species in the world. This scholarly, expansive resource is made possible by the combined expertise of a collective of global ornithology experts who are as inspired as we are to tell the complete […]
Aiman Raza and other colleagues in the Dr. Kevin Omland Lab
Aiman Raza, University of Maryland, Baltimore County August 14, 2020
Birds of the World is working with several educators and institutions to help students produce revisions of species accounts. Aiman Raza is an undergraduate at the University of Maryland, Baltimore County, and has been working with Dr.
Jerry Liguori
Kathi Borgmann July 10, 2020
Nobody knows raptors better than Jerry Liguori—the authority on North American hawks. Liguori has authored numerous articles and three authoritative, must-have books on raptor identification, as well as a ground-breaking video-focused raptor ID app.
Sartaj Ghuman June 10, 2020
First described in 1873 by Allan Octavian Hume, the Narcondam Hornbill (Rhyticeros narcondami) remains as much an enigma as it was when first spotted. As Hume’s ship approached the island, the large white-tailed birds seen flying from tree to tree were mistaken to be Nicobar pigeons that the party had been seeing a lot of.