SPECIES

Connecticut Warbler Oporornis agilis Scientific name definitions

Jay Pitocchelli, Julie L. Jones, and David C. Jones
Version: 2.0 — Published June 2, 2023

References

Literature Cited

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Recommended Citation

Pitocchelli, J., J. L. Jones, and D. Jones (2023). Connecticut Warbler (Oporornis agilis), version 2.0. In Birds of the World (P. G. Rodewald, Editor). Cornell Lab of Ornithology, Ithaca, NY, USA. https://doi.org/10.2173/bow.conwar.02