- Eyebrowed Jungle-Flycatcher
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Eyebrowed Jungle-Flycatcher Vauriella gularis Scientific name definitions

Timothy R. Forrester and Peter Clement
Version: 2.0 — Published February 18, 2022
Revision Notes

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Introduction

The Eyebrowed Jungle-Flycatcher is an enigmatic Old World flycatcher (Muscicapidae) that is endemic to the mountains of Borneo. This species inhabits the understory and midstory of wet primary montane rainforest and is absent from secondary forest, but often forages along roadsides at dawn and dusk. Despite appearing similar to and sharing an English name with the Cyornis jungle-flycatchers, the Vauriella jungle-flycatchers are now known to belong to the subfamily Saxicolinae, where they are more closely related to Asian and Indonesian robins and shortwings (i.e., Leonardina, Heinrichia, Brachypteryx) than to the Cyornis jungle-flycatchers. Eyebrowed Jungle-Flycatcher is distinguished from other Bornean muscicapids by its distinctive white supercilium and throat, and its chunky appearance. This lethargic species can be difficult to locate as it is not very vocal and spends long periods of time sitting still in the dark understory, waiting for passing insect prey. However, once spotted, this species is often quite tame and approachable. This species is also remarkably long-lived for a passerine of its size, with 85% of adults surviving each year. Currently recognized as monotypic, birds in the Kelabit Highlands of Sarawak are reportedly larger and may represent a distinct subspecies, which has been proposed as kamlae (1).

Distribution of the Eyebrowed Jungle-Flycatcher - Range Map
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  • Year-round
  • Migration
  • Breeding
  • Non-Breeding
Distribution of the Eyebrowed Jungle-Flycatcher

Recommended Citation

Forrester, T. R. and P. Clement (2022). Eyebrowed Jungle-Flycatcher (Vauriella gularis), version 2.0. In Birds of the World (S. M. Billerman, Editor). Cornell Lab of Ornithology, Ithaca, NY, USA. https://doi.org/10.2173/bow.eyjfly1.02