SPECIES

Bahama Oriole Icterus northropi

Aiman Raza, Matthew Kane, and Kevin Omland
Version: 2.0 — Published July 16, 2020

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Adult
Immature
Adult
Adult
Adult
Fledgling Bahama Oriole.

Fledglings are dull olive, with dusky gray-brown wings and pale greenish-yellow wingbars. The underparts are lighter, and the throat and lower belly are tinged brighter yellow green.

Juvenile Bahama Oriole.

Upperparts are grayish brown; the feathers of the mantle with darker feather centers, creating a slightly scaled appearance. The lores are dusky black.

Juvenile Bahama Oriole.

The remiges are gray brown, with whitish-yellow tips to the median and greater coverts forming two wingbars. The underparts are dull yellow, with a dusky wash on the lower throat and upper breast. The flanks, belly, vent, and uppertail coverts are brighter, approaching a dull lemon yellow. The tail is a dusky olive brown.

Juvenile Bahama Oriole.

Young birds acquire progressively more black feathers on the throat and head.

Immature Bahama Oriole.
Immature Bahama Oriole.
Immature Bahama Oriole.

Many or most yearling Bahama Orioles have a black throat patch extending from the throat to the auriculars.

Adult Bahama Oriole.

Lesser and median wing coverts lemon yellow. Greater wing coverts and remiges black, slightly duller than head, throat, and back.

Adult Bahama Oriole.

Lower breast, belly, tibial feathering, and undertail coverts lemon yellow.

Adult Bahama Oriole.

Head, throat, upper breast, back, and scapulars deep black. Rump and uppertail coverts lemon yellow. Tail black, slightly duller than head, throat, and back.

Bahama Oriole nest.

Nests are typically suspended from palm fronds.

Bahama Oriole building nest.
Bahama Oriole nest.
Bahama Oriole nest.

The nest is an enclosed basket constructed of plant fibers.

Adult Bahama Oriole feeding young.
Adult Bahama Oriole feeding young.

Recommended Citation

Raza, A., M. Kane, and K. Omland (2020). Bahama Oriole (Icterus northropi), version 2.0. In Birds of the World (P. G. Rodewald and B. K. Keeney, Editors). Cornell Lab of Ornithology, Ithaca, NY, USA. https://doi.org/10.2173/bow.graori3.02