SPECIES

Olive Oropendola Psarocolius bifasciatus Scientific name definitions

Harold F. Greeney
Version: 2.0 — Published June 10, 2022

Photos from this Account

Adult
Adult
Adult
Habitat
Olive Oropendola (Psarocolius bifasciatus yuracares).

The largest of the South American oropendolas, Olive Oropendola can be reliably distinguished from other similar species by a combination of features including its dark bill tipped with red or orange, its large pink facial patch, and its bicolored plumage.

Possible confusion species: Russet-backed Oropendola (Psarocolius angustifrons angustifrons).

Russet-backed Oropendola (Psarocolius angustifrons) can be differentiated from Olive Oropendola by its nearly uniform dingy olive or russet coloration, its unicolored bill, and lack of pink facial patch.

Possible confusion species: Russet-backed Oropendola (Psarocolius angustifrons alfredi).

Russet-backed Oropendola (Psarocolius angustifrons) can be differentiated from Olive Oropendola by its nearly uniform dingy olive or russet coloration, its unicolored bill, and lack of pink facial patch.

Olive Oropendola.

The largest of the South American oropendolas, Olive Oropendola can be reliably distinguished from other similar species by a combination of features including its dark bill tipped with red or orange, its large pink facial patch, and its bicolored plumage.

Possible confusion species: Green Oropendola (Psarocolius viridis).

Green Oropendola (Psarocolius viridis) has olive (not chestnut) wings, a pale green-and-red bill (though also tipped with orange), and it lacks the conspicuous pink cheek patch.

Olive Oropendola (Psarocolius bifasciatus).

Olive Oropendola can be reliably distinguished from other similar species by a combination of features including its large size, dark bill tipped with red or orange, its large pink facial patch, and its bicolored plumage.

Possible confusion species: Crested Oropendola (Psarocolius decumanus).

Can be differentiated from Olive Oropendola by its smaller size, dark color, pale blue iris, and pale bill.

Olive Oropendola displaying at its nest.

Olive Oropendola nests can be noticeably more cylindrical and thicky clustered than Crested Oropendola (Psarocolius decumanus) nests, and built of coarser fibers.

Possible confusion species: Crested Oropendola (Psarocolius decumanus) displaying at its nest.

Crested Oropendola (Psarocolius decumanus) nests are more neatly woven and elongate pyriform in shape.

Adult lateral view (subspecies bifasciatus).
Adult dorsal view flight (subspecies bifasciatus).
Adult ventral view (subspecies bifasciatus).
Adult ventral view (subspecies bifasciatus).
Close up showing feet and facial markings (subspecies yuracares).
Adult lateral view flight (subspecies yuracares).
Adult ventral view (subspecies yuracares).
Adult lateral view (subspecies yuracares).
Adult dorsal view (subspecies yuracares).
Adult lateral view (subspecies neivae).
Adult ventral view (subspecies neivae).
Adult ventral view (subspecies neivae).
Olive Oropendola (subspecies bifasciatus).

It has three long crest feathers, which may be visible in the field.

Habitat; Putumayo, Colombia.
Habitat; San Martín, Peru
Habitat; Mato Grosso, Brazil
Habitat; Cundinamarca, Colombia.
Habitat; Sucumbíos, Ecuador.
Birds at colony; November, Pará, Brazil.
Adult with nesting material.
Nesting colony.
Adult standing in nest opening.
Nest construction.

Macaulay Library Photos for Olive Oropendola

Top-rated photos submitted to the Macaulay Library via eBird. Note: Our content editors have not confirmed the species identification for these photos.

Recommended Citation

Greeney, H. F. (2022). Olive Oropendola (Psarocolius bifasciatus), version 2.0. In Birds of the World (B. K. Keeney, Editor). Cornell Lab of Ornithology, Ithaca, NY, USA. https://doi.org/10.2173/bow.olioro1.02