SPECIES

Pacific Golden-Plover Pluvialis fulva Scientific name definitions

Oscar W. Johnson, Peter G. Connors, and Peter Pyle
Version: 1.1 — Published April 15, 2021

Tables and Appendices

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Table 1

Measurements (mm) of golden-plover eggs. Data shown as mean ± SD (range).

Region/Source Length Width Sample (1)
American Golden-Plover
Seward Peninsula, AK (2) 47.9 ± 1.9 (44.4-52.1) 33.9 ± 0.5 (32.9-35.3) 40 (10)
Churchill, MB (3) 48.3 ± 1.7 32.8 ± 0.8 88 (23)
Victoria I. and Jenny Lind I., NU (4) 48.8 (44.9-52.8) 33.1 (32.1-34.0) 24 (6)
Unspecified (5) 47.5 (42.0-56.0) 32.5 (30.0-34.5) 143 (-)
Unspecified (6) 48.9 (45.6-53.2) 33.9 (32.3-36.9) 77 (21)
Pacific Golden-Plover
Seward Peninsula, AK (2) 48.4 ± 1.9 (44.3-53.2) 33.0 ± 0.7 (31.4-34.0) 44 (11)
Yamal Peninsula, Siberia (3) 46.9 ± 1.7 32.5 ± 0.8 36 (9)
Unspecified (5) 48.0 (45.2-51.8) 33.2 (31.5-34.9) 34 (-)
Unspecified (6) 49.0 (46.5-52.3) 33.7 (32.1-35.7) 88 (22)
ne. Siberia (7) 48.0 (46.8-49.7) 32.8 (31.0-35.0) 44 (11)
Taimyr Peninsula, Siberia (8) 47.6 ± 1.3 32.8 ± 0.7 277 (73)

(1) No. of eggs (no. of clutches).

(2) OWJ.

(3) Byrkjedal and Thompson 1998.

(4) Parmelee et al. 1967.

(5) U.S. National Museum collections; Bent 1929.

(6) Western Foundation of Vertebrate Zoology collections.

(7) Kondratiev 1982.

(8) Schekkerman et al. 2004, I Tulp in litt.

Appendix 1

Linear (mm) and mass (g) measurements of Pacific Golden-Plovers(1). Data shown as mean ± SD (range; n).

Males Females Combined Male and Female
Wing Length (2)
Seward Peninsula, AK (3) 170 ± 4.6 (158-185; 93)
nw. Taimyr Peninsula, Siberia (4) 169 ± 3.6 (158-177; 56)
se. Taimyr Peninsula, Siberia (5) 167 ± 4.0 (158-174; 75)
n. Taimyr Peninsula, Siberia (6) 170 ± 4.5 (162-178; 23)
Siberia (7) 165 ± 3.8 (159-174; 34) 166 ± 4.7 (158-173; 17)
Region(s) not indicated (8) 164 (157-173; 32) 162 (152-168; 28)
Siberia (9) 161 (153-170; 17) 158 (152-160; 9)
Siberia, Gidansk Peninsula to Kolyma Lowlands, also Asiatic mainland (10) 159 (151-166; 39) 162 (157-167; 16)
Chukotskiy Peninsula, Anadyr, Pacific coast (10) 162 (154-173; 39) 161 (156-166; 15)
Chukchi Peninsula (11) 161 (150-171; 121)
Oahu, HI (12) 171 ± 4.5 (158-184; 656)
Wake I. (13) 163 (152-171; 28) 164 (159-168; 15)
Enewetak Atoll, Marshall I. (14) 172 ± 4.1 (164-179; 31)
Saipan and Tinian I., Mariana I. (15) 166 ± 4.7 (156-176; 48)
American Samoa (16) 172 ± 4.1 (165-180; 39)
Victoria, Australia (17) 174 ± 5.1 (161-183; 35)
Torey Depression, Mongolia (18) 169 ± 4.3 (158-178; 307)
Bill Length
Seward Peninsula, AK (3) 23.0 ± 1.0 (20.2-25.5; 85)
nw. Taimyr Peninsula, Siberia (4) 22.1 ± 1.1 (19.9-24.8; 57)
se. Taimyr Peninsula, Siberia (5) 22.9 ± 1.1 (20.2-25.6; 79)
n. Taimyr Peninsula, Siberia (6) 22.6 ± 0.9 (20.8-23.9; 23)
Siberia (7) 23.4 ± 1.3 (21-25; 34) 23.4 ± 0.9 (22-25; 17)
Region(s) not indicated (8) 22.5 (20-25; 70)
Oahu, HI (12) 24.4 ± 1.0 (21.8-27.6; 507)
Saipan and Tinian I., Mariana I. (15) 23.6 ± 0.9 (22.0-25.7; 48)
American Samoa (16) 24.2 ± 1.1 (21.4-27.1; 39)
Victoria, Australia (17) 23.7 ± 1.5 (20.3-26.3; 31)
Torey Depression, Mongolia (18) 23.1 ± 1.0 (20.0-27.7; 295)
Total Head Length
Seward Peninsula, AK (3) 57.3 ± 1.4 (54.1-60.8; 77)
nw. Taimyr Peninsula, Siberia (4) 56.4 ± 1.4 (51.4-59.3; 56)
se. Taimyr Peninsula, Siberia (5) 56.4 ± 1.2 (53.3-58.6; 79)
n. Taimyr Peninsula, Siberia (6) 56.2 ± 1.3 (54.5-57.9; 9)
Oahu, HI (12) 58.6 ± 1.3 (55.3-62.1; 507)
Saipan and Tinian I., Mariana I. (15) 57.6 ± 1.4 (54.5-59.8; 48)
American Samoa (16) 58.5 ± 1.4 (54.9-61.0; 38)
Victoria, Australia (17) 57.2 ± 2.1 (52.9-61.2; 30)
Torey Depression, Mongolia (18) 56.8 ± 1.4 (51.1-60.3; 309)
Tarsus Length
Seward Peninsula, AK (3) 44.9 ± 1.5 (42.0-48.4; 82)
nw. Taimyr Peninsula, Siberia (4) 42.9 ± 1.5 (39.3-47.9; 56)
se. Taimyr Peninsula, Siberia (5) 43.5 ± 1.6 (40.5-47.4; 79)
n. Taimyr Peninsula, Siberia (6) 44.3 ± 2.0 (41.8-50.4; 23)
Siberia (7) 43.3 ± 1.9 (41-47; 34) 43.7 ± 1.2 (42-46; 17)
Region(s) not indicated (8) 41.6 (39-46; 68)
Oahu, HI (12) 46.0 ± 1.5 (41.7-50.4; 486)
Saipan and Tinian I., Mariana I. (15) 44.4 ± 1.5 (42.3-48.2; 48)
American Samoa (16) 45.6 ± 1.8 (42.3-50.0; 39)
Tail Length
Siberia (7) 61.4 ± 2.6 (57-69; 34) 60.8 ± 4.1 (54-70; 17)
Mass
Seward Peninsula, AK (3) 128 ± 7.9 (102-152; 52) 138 ± 12.5 (113-168; 41)
n. Taimyr Peninsula, Siberia (6) 130 ± 6.4 (116-141; 14) 136 ± 10.7 (116-149; 11)
Saipan and Tinian I., Mariana I. (15) 115.6 ± 15.4 (88-148; 48)
American Samoa (16) 172 ± 23.8 (108-212; 39)
Torey Depression, Mongolia (18) 143 ± 18.1 (100-184; 309)
nw. Taimyr Peninsula, Siberia (19) 130 ± 4.7 (n = 19) 135 ± 8.9 (n = 18)
Oahu, HI (20) 118 ± 8.2 (102-138; 17)
Oahu, HI (21) 171 ± 15.6 (140-228; 296)
Victoria, Australia (22) 130 ± 5.1 (119-136; 15)
Victoria, Australia (23) 158 ± 13.4 (125-178; 19)

(1)Where known, age composition of samples noted below.

(2) Except for source 11, all combined male and female wing measurements are of flattened, straightened primaries on birds captured for banding; sources 7-11 vary as to measurement technique and often involve museum specimens with degrees of shrinkage; source 13 measured wing chord of captured birds.

(3) Nesting birds, late May through Jun (OWJ).

(4) Nesting birds (H. Schekkerman and I. Tulp in litt.).

(5) Nesting birds (M. Soloviev and T. Sviridova in litt.).

(6) Nesting birds (P. Tomkovich in litt.).

(7) Breeding birds (Cramp and Simmons 1983).

(8) Status of birds unknown (Prater et al. 1977)

(9) Samples probably include breeding birds, migrants, and juveniles (Dement'ev et al. 1951).

(10) Samples probably include breeding birds, migrants, and juveniles (Kozlova 1961).

(11) Samples probably include breeding birds, migrants, and juveniles (Portenko 1972a).

(12) Wintering birds, adults and juveniles (OWJ).

(13) Wintering birds and transients, probably some juveniles (Johnston and McFarlane 1967).

(14) Wintering birds and fall transients, 4 adults and 27 juveniles (Johnson et al. 1989e).

(15) Spring pre-migrants (early Apr, 23 adults and 25 first-year; OWJ).

(16) Spring pre-migrants (early Apr, 32 adults and 7 first-year; OWJ)

(17) Wintering birds (Barter 1988)

(18) Transients at spring stopover site (J. Jukema, J. Reneerkens, J. Wijmenga in litt.)

(19) Nesting/brooding birds (Schekkerman et al. 2004)

(20) Fall arrivals (mid-Aug to mid-Sep; Johnson et al. 1989e)

(21) Spring pre-migrants (late Apr; OWJ)

(22) Fall arrivals (Oct; Barter 1988)

(23) Spring pre-migrants (Mar; Barter 1988)

Recommended Citation

Johnson, O. W., P. G. Connors, and P. Pyle (2021). Pacific Golden-Plover (Pluvialis fulva), version 1.1. In Birds of the World (P. G. Rodewald, B. K. Keeney, and S. M. Billerman, Editors). Cornell Lab of Ornithology, Ithaca, NY, USA. https://doi.org/10.2173/bow.pagplo.01.1